The Leasing GroupThe Leasing Group

Archive : August 2014

buisness advice 101

By The Leasing Group

Creating a Culture of Superior Service

“Will you be dining in with us today?”

 

“Please let us know if anything fails to meet your expectations.”

 

“Enjoy your lunch and have a great rest of the day”

 

“It’s been a pleasure serving you.”

 

These words are straight from an employee at a certain local restaurant…a “fast food” restaurant.  And they aren’t just words.  Based on its level of service, this restaurant really means what it says.

 

With so many horror stories related to bad customer service, superior service is a welcome change that grabs our attention every time.  How does one company do it when others can’t?  Do they only hire and train people how care?  There must be a logical explanation.

 

  • Perhaps caring employees are too hard to find.
  • Perhaps good service is not something that can be easily taught.
  • Perhaps customer service is difficult to practice consistently, no matter how intentional.

 

 

While all three possibilities have some validity, there might be another explanation, one having more to do with employers than the people they hire.

 

Could it be that most businesses really don’t care about superior service, at least not enough to invest company time and resources?  And, if employers don’t care, is it any surprise when their employees don’t care either?

 

Leasing Questions? (502) 456-2800

Business Leasing Application Online

More Experience, More Sources, More Approvals

the truth in business

By The Leasing Group

Truth about the Minimum Wage

Ask about anyone to weigh in on an increase in the minimum wage and you’re bound to get an emotional response.  As with abortion, gun control, and taxes, there’s very little middle ground on this issue.  The minimum wage is very polarizing topic.  Forget about changing minds.

 

For dissenters, the logic goes something like this…a free market system allocates resources, including labor, more efficiently than any other system.  Government interference only serves to disrupt this efficiency resulting in slower economic growth, higher labor costs and lower employment, all bad for businesses and for their workers.  Worse yet, the minimum wage is inflationary, and we all know what that means.  End of story.

 

I’m sure the intellectual thinkers of the day came to this conclusion honestly and without prejudice.  However, in its seventy-five year history, the minimum wage has not been the culprit feared by economic experts.

 

First, there is no evidence linking the minimum wage to a softening economy.  Second, with few exceptions, businesses don’t typically lay off workers just because of hourly wage increases.  Even when they do, unemployment does not necessarily rise.  Third, in a labor driven market, workers typically make more than the minimum anyway.  An increase rarely has the predicted impact.

 

For supporters, the arguments are more tangible.  With so many workers teetering at the poverty level, we’re all better off when workers and their families don’t require the public safety net.  And, since the cost of welfare in all its forms far exceeds the inflationary cost of wage increases, doesn’t a rising tide lift all boats?   Additionally, working families contribute to the tax base.

 

On balance, a modest increase in the minimum wage actually does more good than bad.  I think its time for conservatives (me included) to get out of the way.

 

Leasing Questions? (502) 456-2800

Business Leasing Application Online

More Experience, More Sources, More Approvals

buisness advice 101
Creating a Culture of Superior Service
the truth in business
Truth about the Minimum Wage